Introducing Rhythm: it is not just for backing a Soloist

Rhythm and having a good understanding of rhythmic concepts is often seen as being less important than playing through numerous scales fast or just seen as being the staple of the backing guitarist taking a back seat whilst the soloist grabs the limelight. This is not strictly true. In fact some if not all the greatest Soloists demonstrate a complete mastery and understanding of rhythmic concepts and that is ultimately what makes them the great players that they are or were.

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The Blues Scale

In this Post we will be looking at the Blues Scale. To me this is one of the top most useful Scales. Most reference sources will show you the Blues Scale in its Minor Form with a Flattened 3 rd degree (bIII) and a flattened fifth degree( bV). This is okay but it is really half of the story and half of the usefulness of this particular Scale. This is because if you make the Blues Scale into a Major Scale Pattern then the Flattened fifth note (bV) actually now becomes the flattened 3rd (bIII). The Flattened 3rd when played against a Major Chord or Dominant 7th chord is a true Blues Note found in many examples of Blues Styles. So by changing the Blues Scale to a Major pattern you have got instant access to the Blues. I will show you how to do this but most of you will already have covered all this if you have already been studying my approach to the CAGED System (C-A-G-E-D). If not go and have a look at this as it shows you how to use the 5 patterns to find both major and minor scales from pentatonic scale shapes.

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