Category Archives: CAGED System for Guitar

The Caged System helps guitarists build chords and scales. This is a my new interpretation of the Caged System and turns the learning of it upside down by simplifying it an removing confusing terms. My system is radically different to how it is traditionally taught to students. With a brand new graphic interpretation and the teaching of only 5 basic patterns the Caged System helps it become much clearer and less confusing for students. My method helps learn you quicker and cuts out the unnecessary waste.

Finding the Chords in the Patterns

So far I have given you the scale shape patterns for both the Minor and the Major. Now we are going to look more closely at what these notes in the respective scales actually are. Basically I am going to throw some theory at you.

Once we have done this I can discuss what are probably the most important scales to know. So far we have only looked at Pentatonic Shapes: this means that these are are shortened version of scales. These Scales contain only 5 notes hence Penta. Full scales usually contain 8 notes so a C major scale would have 8 notes beginning on C (Root) and ending on C an Octave higher = 8 notes. Pentatonic Scales are easier to remember because they only contain 5 notes. However it is possible to use the Pentatonic Scales either Minor or Major to develop a full scale of 8 notes or more by adding some of the missing notes depending upon which scale you want.

Continue reading Finding the Chords in the Patterns

C-A-G-E-D Part Vi

Here are all the 5 Shapes presented as minor Shapes

Here are all the 5 shapes presented as Minor Shape Patterns. As I mentioned earlier this is the easiest way to remember the shapes and the position of the Root Notes. This is important because it allows us to then use our system to find the position for the Major Shape Pattern. Simply go back 3 frets from any of the Root Notes in the Patterns and you will find the VI note. When you have found the VI note simply re-position the same pattern to start from the VI note. Obviously the Root of the major scale shape (Key Note) will be the note you play in the pattern after the VI Note. If unsure go back to part V to familiarize yourself with this concept.

Continue reading C-A-G-E-D Part Vi

CAGED System Part 4

Hello again and welcome to Part IV of my article on the CAGED System. In this part we are going to explore what can make a Shape pattern Major or Minor. First though a bit of music theory.

In every Major Scale there is a relative minor chord. The minor chord can be found by building a chord starting on the VI degree ( 6th note ) of the major scale.  Lets take C Major Scale because it has no sharps or flats and is the easiest scale to look at. The Stating note of the Major Scale is obviously a C note. From now on we will refer to the starting note as the ROOT NOTE. This is the root note of the scale – the starting note.

The Scale of C Major is as follows

Continue reading CAGED System Part 4

The CAGED System Part 3

Welcome to part 3 of the CAGED System explanation. Here is the point where I give you the remaining fingering patterns for the 4 remaining elements of the C-A-G-E-D Grid. So far we have only seen the one pattern for the G letter. Now I give you the C, the A, the E and the D.

Lets start at the next letter along from the G on the C-A-G-E-D Grid, namely the E. Here is the E Shape pattern to learn.

Continue reading The CAGED System Part 3

The CAGED system

Welcome to my approach to learning the CAGED Guitar System for the guitar. Many tutors that I have seen have seen approach the CAGED Guitar System by relating the System to the various Chord Shapes associated with it. They then go on to confuse the student by having 2 names for what is essentially the same shape pattern by having one name for the minor and another different name for the major shape personally find this confusing and it distracts from the usefulness of the CAGED Guitar System. My system use only one name per shape but shows you how to alter the series of notes in the pattern to make the same shape either Major or Minor. I believe that this makes it quicker to learn and easier to both remember and apply.

One of the problems with the traditional approach is that it makes you first think of where the respective chords will be found on the fingerboard and it relates to a specific Chord Shape such as the C Shape or G Shape Chord with specific fingerings associated with these chords. The problems with this method is that a C Chord Shape will change its name according to where you place this shape on the fingerboard. So a  C Shape Chord played at Fret 3 will sound like a C Chord but move this Chord Shape to Fret 7 for example and the chord will now be a E Chord. What happens, I have found,is that you can get confused about having to relate the Shape to the actual name of the Chord. You start to wonder why a D Chord is using a C Shape. Too much name shifting to do.

I prefer to stick to a series of 5 fingering patterns each associated with a reference point in the CAGED guitar System. Once you have these in your grasp then Chord Building around these patterns comes as the very last discipline rather than the first as referenced above and as most tutors seem to be inclined to teach.

The CAGED guitar System is a very useful tool for finding scales and switching between scales. It is also useful for Chord Building and there are Chord Shapes built around the various patterns of the CAGED Guitar System. However my approach to it is slightly different to how I have seen others teach this system. I prefer to look at the CAGED SYSTEM like this.

C_A_G_E_D-raw Continue reading The CAGED system